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Scholar


Audrey M. Wozniak is an ethnomusicologist who writes about discursive and material constructions of kinship and the state in urban diasporic contexts, particularly those of Turkey and China. Her research interests also include sociolinguistics, technology, state surveillance, and censorship. She has been conducting ethnographic and archival fieldwork in Istanbul and London since 2015, examining how the concept of discipline has shaped Turkish civil society through examining Turkish classical music choirs in the country and its diaspora. She is currently a Ph.D. Candidate in Ethnomusicology at Harvard University and the Joint Fellow in Heritage Studies at Koç University's Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations and the British Institute at Ankara. She has also received a Fulbright-Hays DDRA Grant, an Orient-Institut Scholarship, and Cynthia Verba Merit Scholarship to support her research. 

Wozniak is an accomplished violinist and performer of Turkish and Western art music and her participation as a musician is an integral part of her research. For more information about her musical experience, please visit this link.

Curriculum Vitae
 
Lecture for the British Institute at Ankara, 2022


Academic Publications
Essays, Reviews, and News Articles
Previous Blogs
  • On Global Harmony: "In which Audrey Woźniak chronicles a year as a Thomas J. Watson Fellow exploring multiculturalism in the musical cultures of China, Indonesia, and Turkey." [2014-2015]
  • The Guangzhou Blog: "In which Audrey Woźniak chronicles twelve weeks of living and learning in China as an intern for the State Department at the U.S. Consulate General in Guangzhou" [Summer 2013] ***The Guangzhou Blog is currently locked.
  • The Beijing Blog: "In which Audrey Woźniak chronicles ten weeks of living and learning in China as an intern for ABC News." [Summer 2012]
  • The Tokyo Blog"In which Audrey Wozniak describes the pre-, post-, and the in between of living in Japan for a year." [2007-2008. My very first blog, in which Audrey chronicled her time as the only foreign exchange student in an all-Japanese girls high school.]